FOUR FIREFIGHTERS TRANSPORTED TO HOSPITAL AFTER FENTANYL EXPOSURE

FOUR FIREFIGHTERS TRANSPORTED TO HOSPITAL AFTER FENTANYL EXPOSURE

This morning, at approximately 8:00 am, Ladder 7 responded to a call of two people unconscious in a vehicle in a vacant lot in the 2700 block of NW 22nd Ave. Unbeknownst to the firefighters, the patients were suffering from an overdose.

FOUR FIREFIGHTERS TRANSPORTED TO HOSPITAL AFTER FENTANYL EXPOSURE

During treatment, Ladder 7’s crew became exposed to a powdered substance and had to be transported to the hospital for examination. Cape Coral’s Hazardous Materials Team responded to identify the substance and confirmed it was fentanyl. Three of the firefighters were cleared to return to work, and one firefighter was sent home as a safety precaution. Ladder 7 and the Lee County ambulances used for transport were decontaminated before being placed back into service.

FOUR FIREFIGHTERS TRANSPORTED TO HOSPITAL AFTER FENTANYL EXPOSURE

Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is over 50 times more potent than morphine. It blocks pain receptors so is prescribed for pain management. However, receptors for opioids are also found in the areas of the brain that control breathing, so high doses can cause respiratory arrest, possibly leading to death. Minor exposure to fentanyl can result in lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea, slow and shallow breathing, and respiratory depression.

FOUR FIREFIGHTERS TRANSPORTED TO HOSPITAL AFTER FENTANYL EXPOSURE

American Flag Retirement Ceremony

American Flag Retirement Ceremony

Citizens who love and care for their flag realize there will come a time when it must be retired.

If Old Glory is unable to be repaired or is too worn or tattered, then the revered symbol of our nation demands the highest level of respect and should be disposed of in a respectable manner.

According to the U.S. Flag Code: “The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem of display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.”

This Friday, on Flag Day, from 9 to 10:30 am, the Southwest Florida Military Museum & Library at 4820 Leonard Street, Cape Coral, will be participating in the time-honored tradition of properly disposing of the nation’s colors.

This solemn, dignified event will include the American Legion Post 90 Color Guard and Honor Guard who will present colors and offer a 21-gun salute.

Other participants will include the Cape Coral Fire Department, who will bring a vehicle for tours; the Cape Coral Police Department, who will bring a SWAT vehicle and K-9 units, as well as a fingerprinting station for children. Boy Scout Troop 777 will be collecting serviceable flags for retirement.

Inside the military museum, a brunch can be purchased from 10 until 11:30 a.m. and the museum will be open for tours until 5 p.m.

Dennis Stebbins (239-940-1401) is a point of contact for the event.

CCFD Responds to Two Unattended Cooking Fires

CCFD Responds to Two Unattended Cooking Fires

Cooking fires are the number one cause of home fires and home injuries. Just this week the Cape Coral Fire Department responded to two unattended cooking fires. In both incidents, the residents left the oil they were heating unattended while they engaged in another activity. When they returned, the oil had caught fire.

Again, in both incidents, the residents picked up the pan containing the burning oil and attempted to take it outside. In the first incident, oil spilled from the pan and both residents required transport to Tampa General Hospital with severe burns to over 70% of their bodies. In the second incident, the resident was more fortunate as she was not injured and the damage to the garage, where she was cooking, was only $400.

The Cape Coral Fire Department offers these safety tips to prevent these types of fires and injuries:

  1. Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  2. If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, remain in the home and use a timer to remind yourself to check it regularly.
  3. NEVER use water on an oil or grease fire. The old saying “oil and water don’t mix” remains true, even if (especially if) the oil is on fire.
  4. Instead, cover the pan with the lid, turn off the burner, and leave it until it is completely cooled. Or, use a fire extinguisher. NEVER attempt to remove a pan with oil or grease that is on fire from the stovetop. Even a few drops of hot oil or grease can cause 1st, 2nd, or even 3rd degree burns.
  5. Always call 9-1-1.
CCFD Responds to Two Unattended Cooking Fires
CAPE CORAL FIREFIGHTER PASSING

CAPE CORAL FIREFIGHTER PASSING

CAPE CORAL FIREFIGHTER PASSING

It is with great regret that the Cape Coral Fire Department announces the passing of Firefighter Christopher Asseff. His death occurred off duty on Saturday, February 2 and is currently under investigation.

Firefighter Asseff was hired in July 2018. He was well-liked, had earned the respect of his crew, and was known as a hard worker with a positive attitude. He was excited to be a brother in the Cape Coral Fire Department and had a promising career in front of him.

Our thoughts and deepest sympathies are with his family, friends, and fellow brothers and sisters.

CAPE CORAL FIREFIGHTER PASSING
CAPE CORAL FIRE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES ANNUAL HOLIDAY FIRE SAFETY CAMPAIGN

CAPE CORAL FIRE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES ANNUAL HOLIDAY FIRE SAFETY CAMPAIGN

Saturday marked the beginning of the Cape Coral Fire Department’s annual “Keep the Wreath Green” fire safety campaign.

CAPE CORAL FIRE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES ANNUAL HOLIDAY FIRE SAFETY CAMPAIGN

For the sixth year, Cape Coral firefighters have hung a wreath illuminated with green bulbs at Fire Station 4, located at 2007 Santa Barbara Boulevard. 

If a preventable fire such as cooking, smoking, holiday decorations, candles, etc. occurs between December 1 and January 1, one of the green bulbs will change to red.

Though fire safety should be a year-round priority, particular precautions need to be taken during the holiday season, and the “Keep the Wreath Green” campaign serves as a reminder of this. With the hectic holiday season, it is easy for families to become complacent about fire safety.

CAPE CORAL FIRE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES ANNUAL HOLIDAY FIRE SAFETY CAMPAIGN

“As everyone gets busier during the holidays, we often become rushed, distracted or tired,” says Fire Chief Ryan W. Lamb, “And with the additional use of decorative lighting, live Christmas trees, increased cooking activities, and the burning of candles, the risk of fire in homes increases.”

The first two years of the campaign ended with the wreath displaying five red bulbs. Since then, only one or two green bulbs have changed to red.

This year, there has already been one green bulb that changed to red. On Saturday, the day the wreath was hung, there was an unattended cooking fire that, fortunately, did not result in any injuries but did cause $147,000 in damage.

To help “Keep the Wreath Green” and the community safe, the Cape Coral Fire Department offers these holiday safety tips:

Decorations:

CAPE CORAL FIRE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES ANNUAL HOLIDAY FIRE SAFETY CAMPAIGN
  • Choose holiday decorations carefully, using those only made of flame-resistant, flame-retardant, or non-combustible materials.
  • Keep decorations away from heat sources. Of the fires that began with decorations, nearly half occurred due to the decoration’s proximity to a heat source.
  • Keep decorations away from windows and doors that might be needed as a means of escape.

Candles:

CAPE CORAL FIRE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES ANNUAL HOLIDAY FIRE SAFETY CAMPAIGN
  • Keep candles at least 12” away from decorations or other combustible materials. Two of every five home decoration fires are started by candles.
  • Never leave candles unattended. Extinguish them when you leave the room.
  • Use sturdy candle holders that won’t tip over.

Lights:

CAPE CORAL FIRE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES ANNUAL HOLIDAY FIRE SAFETY CAMPAIGN
  • Use only lights listed by an independent testing laboratory and pay close attention to the manufacturer’s instructions for use.
  • Closely inspect all holiday lighting before use to insure all wires, bulbs and connections are in a safe condition. Discard any lights with exposed wires, broken insulation, cracked or missing bulbs, or other defects.
  • Use clips, not nails, to hang lights so the cords do not become damaged.
  • Turn off all light strings and decorations before leaving home or going to bed.

Christmas trees:

CAPE CORAL FIRE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES ANNUAL HOLIDAY FIRE SAFETY CAMPAIGN
  • Before purchasing an artificial tree, be sure it is identified by the manufacturer as fire-retardant.
  • When choosing a live Christmas tree, look for signs of freshness by lightly pulling branches through your closed fist. Fresh trees should retain their needles during this test.
  • Have the tree lot operator provide a “fresh cut” by removing 1-2” from the base of the trunk.
  • Immediately place the tree in water and add water daily. Keep a close check on the dryness of the tree and remove the tree when needles easily fall off.
  • Make sure the tree is not blocking an exit and is at least three feet away from any heat source like fireplaces, space heaters, radiators, candles, heat vents or lights.
  • The Cape Coral Fire Department has provided all Christmas tree vendors in Cape Coral with tree hanger tags that are printed with these important safety tips to remind consumers what precautions to take to prevent Christmas tree fires. 

Cooking:

CAPE CORAL FIRE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES ANNUAL HOLIDAY FIRE SAFETY CAMPAIGN
  • Unattended cooking is the leading cause of U.S. home fires and home fire injuries. After Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and Christmas Eve are the peak days for home cooking fires.
  • When frying, grilling, or broiling, stay in the kitchen. Keep anything that can catch fire away from the stovetop and turn off the stove when you leave the kitchen, even if it’s for a short period of time.
  • When simmering, boiling, baking or roasting food, stay in the home and check on it frequently; use a timer as a reminder if necessary.
  • Create a “kid-free zone” of at least three feet around the stove and areas where hot food and drinks are prepared or carried.

Smoking:

CAPE CORAL FIRE DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES ANNUAL HOLIDAY FIRE SAFETY CAMPAIGN
  • Ask smokers to smoke outside.
  • Use large, deep ashtrays and wet cigarette butts with water before discarding.
  • Keep matches and lighters up high, away from children.
  • Ensure there is a working smoke alarm on each level of your home and practice fire escape plans with all family members and holiday guests.

“The holidays can quickly turn from joyful to tragic when a fire occurs,” says Andrea Schuch, Public Affairs Specialist for the Cape Coral Fire Department. “By taking simple precautions, Cape Coral residents and visitors can stay safe, have holidays that are healthy and happy, and avoid potential fire hazards to ‘Keep the Wreath Green.’”

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